Sanitation Project

Sanitation Project to End Open Defecation

 

Over 600 million Indians defecate in the open every day. The result is a host of diseases such as diarrhoea, stunting of children’s growth and opportunistic infections such as pneumonia. Women face the threat of assault when they defecate in the open after dark. This is indeed a silent emergency of enormous proportions.

 The Rotary Club of Madras realized that merely building toilets would not be enough, that toilets constructed without bringing about the required attitudinal change often remain unused or are maintained in a filthy manner. The Club resolved to address the challenges and took up Amarampedu Village in Gummidipoondi, 60 km from Chennai, India as a pilot. The village had just one toilet for over a hundred households when the Club’s Sanitation Project kicked off in July, 2014. An NGO has partnered with us to help in the behavioral change.

Today, Amarampedu is out of the sanitation crisis: it boasts of a toilet in each of its 109 households.

The Amarampedu effort used a variant of the “Community Led Total Sanitation” (CLTS) method. It relied on “triggers” such as disgust and shame to make communities change their behaviour in a sustainable manner. Professional consultants were employed to bring about the change. Thereafter the construction of toilets was community-led.

The Club assisted the villagers with a rolling fund, to be replenished in part by back ended government subsidy. Leach pit toilet technology, which requires minimal water has been deployed. The Club also provided technical oversight for construction, helped source skilled workers such as masons and advised the Village Head on land use disputes. Unskilled labour was voluntarily provided by the villagers themselves.

The extraordinary success of the Amarampedu project received widespread attention RI Dist.3230 has made Sanitation a District Focus Project in 2015-16, and our Past President Rtn Srikanth was invited by Rotary International to deliver a talk on the Project at RI’s annual Convention in Sao Paulo, Brazil in June 2015 and the Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad, one of the world’s best known business schools is developing a case study on the Amarampedu experience.

Till date this has been implemented in four villages and over 550 Toilets have been built.

It is a record that Rotary Club of Madras has been able to achieve open defecation free status in the four villages. During the year 2017-2018 one more village will be made Open defecation free. Over 200 toilets will be built here.

This Project is gaining momentum year after year. Hopefully one day it will become a major movement to make India Open Defecation free.

Besides this we have built two large artisan wells at Gummudipundi. This is helping the people in the nearby villages to get food drinking water.

 

The Rotary Club of Madras realized that merely building toilets would not be enough, that toilets constructed without bringing about the required attitudinal change often remain unused or are maintained in a filthy manner. The Club resolved to address the challenges and took up Amarampedu Village in Gummidipoondi, 60 km from Chennai, India as a pilot. The village had just one toilet for over a hundred households when the Club’s Sanitation Project kicked off in July, 2014.

Today, Amarampedu is out of the sanitation crisis: it boasts of a toilet in each of its 109 households.

The Amarampedu effort used a variant of the “Community Led Total Sanitation” (CLTS) method. It relied on “triggers” such as disgust and shame to make communities change their behavior in a sustainable manner. Professional consultants were employed to bring about the change. Thereafter the construction of toilets was community-led.

The Club assisted the villagers with a rolling fund, to be replenished in part by back ended government subsidy. Leach pit toilet technology, which requires minimal water has been deployed. The Club also provided technical oversight for construction, helped source skilled workers such as masons and advised the Village Head on land use disputes. Unskilled labour was voluntarily provided by the villagers themselves.

The effort was led by Community Services Director Rtn P Suresh, Sanitation Committee Chair Rtn M S Nagarajan and Co-Chair Rtn K N Raja, under the guidance of President Rtn S N Srikanth.

The extraordinary success of the Amarampedu project received widespread attention RI Dist.3230 has made Sanitation a District Focus Project in 2015-16, Rtn Srikanth was invited by the Rotary International to deliver a talk on the Project at RI’s annual Convention in Sao Paulo, Brazil in June 2015 and the Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad, one of the world’s best known business schools is developing a case study on the Amarampedu experience.

Amarampedu Village, Gummidipoondi Taluk,
Thiruvallur Dist, Tamil Nadu